Identifying optimum athletic race track surfacing for greyhounds to reduce risk of injuries is a challenging practice as there are several single and coupled variables that should be considered as risk factors. To study the impact of bend and straight sections, surface type and camber, on biomechanics of galloping quadrupeds, an inertial measurement unit (IMU).

has been used to measure the associated galloping accelerations. The IMU was sewn into a pocket located on the back of the greyhounds racing jacket positioned between the two forelegs. Simultaneous kinematics were performed using high frame rate (HFR) videos for calibrating IMU data. The results showed that there were lower G-forces on galloping on grass than wet sand which is consistent with the mechanical behavior of grass (grass is softer than wet sand). Moreover, galloping around the bend had higher G-forces than galloping along the straight section suggesting an excessive force is applied on the greyhound’s limbs due to centrifugal force. A cambered bend assisted the greyhounds in having a smoother gait and lower G-forces when compared to a flat bend. The results reported in this paper will not only be beneficial for the welfare of racing greyhounds, but will also contribute in the simulation of legged locomotion for bio-inspired engineering and robotics.

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