For any mechanical design project in an industrial setting, computer-aided design (CAD) functions as the cornerstone. Mechanical CAD systems serves as the focal point during conceptualization, design iterations, finalizing design details drawing creation and manufacturing. In most engineering technology programs, CAD, and solid modeling are offered as required courses. However, those courses often stand as “islands” of information. In the university setting, CAD is poorly integrated into the many design problems presented in courses throughout the curriculum. Frequently, students do not gain the experience of using solid models to drive their designs. Too often, their first experience of this real-world design process is “on the job”. Thus, our students are not fully prepared for industrial practice, which is contrary to the mission of engineering technology programs. This paper will present the results of a study that reviewed utilization of solid modeling throughout many baccalaureate mechanical engineering technology (MET) programs. Further, it will present some of the implementation strategies of solid modeling in upper-level, MET courses at the University of Dayton.

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