In recent years many publishing companies have provided optional computer software for engineering textbooks. Some of these software packages are tools for enhancing classroom instruction and others are capable of engineering analysis. Several software are currently available as an option with most engineering thermodynamics. They can be used for thermodynamic property evaluations and are extremely useful tools in analysis and design in introductory courses. They are also useful in teaching fundamental thermodynamic concepts. The most significant advantage of these software programs is that no prior knowledge of programming language is necessary in their applications. This paper will discuss the benefits associated with the use of computer software in introductory thermodynamics courses. Available software tools are compared and, in each case, their strengths and limitations are highlighted. The paper describes how one software tool has been integrated into our introductory thermodynamics course to teach the fundamental concepts. Several examples are provided.

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