In this research, the effect of beam buckling in a predefined direction is used to reduce occupant injuries in frontal crashes of an ultra-low-floor (ULF) city bus. In ULF buses, the floor structure consists of several longitudinal long beams, which in case of a frontal crash may buckle due to the axial impact. The direction of rotational acceleration of the driver seat due to buckling is highly affected by the position of the driver seat. A finite element model of an ULF bus was developed using LS-Dyna. The driver model, a Hybrid III 50th male dummy with deformable jacket and abdomen, was restrained to the seat with a 3-point belt. An Elastic-Plastic material model was used for the bus structure to investigate the buckling behavior of the beam elements. Using diagonal beams to guide the buckling in a desired direction, rewarding results were achieved in reducing the occupant injuries. For example, with an extra diagonal beam under the seat, the driver’s HIC15 was reduced from 739 to 415.7 and HIC36 from 791 to 700.6.

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