The hot embossing technique is becoming an increasingly important alternative to silicon-and glass-based microfabrication technologies. The advantage of hot embossing can be mainly attributed to the versatile properties and mass production capability of polymeric materials. However, because of the use of a large mass in thermal cycling, hot embossing is subject to substantially longer cycle times than those in traditional thermoplastic molding processes.1 The longer dwell time at elevated temperatures could further result in degradation of the embossing polymer, especially for thermally sensitive polymers. The problem exacerbates when thick polymer substrates are used. To address this problem, rapid thermal cycling of the tool is needed. One method for rapid thermal cycling is to employ a low-thermal-mass multilayer mold with electrical heating elements installed right beneath the mold surface.2 This method, however, is complex in nature and may be prone to problems caused by mismatching of thermal and mechanical properties between different layers.

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