A method involving the use of magnetic nanoparticles to suppress the cross-reactions in immunoassay is developed. Antibodies are coated onto magnetic nanoparticles. These antibodies bind with target and non-target molecules. Once an alternative-current magnetic field is applied, magnetic nanoparticles oscillate with the magnetic field. The target and non-target molecules attached onto magnetic nanoparticles via antibodies experience a centrifugal force, which is against the association between antibodies and target/non-target molecules. Theoretically, the centrifugal force is proportional to the square of the frequency of the applied magnetic field. Thus, the strength of the centrifugal force can be manipulated by changing the frequency of the applied magnetic field. By well controlling the frequency of applied magnetic field, the centrifugal force can be stronger than the binding between antibodies and non-target molecules, but still weaker than that of target molecules. Consequently, the binding between antibodies and non-target molecules is broken by the centrifugal force.

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