The interactive effects of prior-deformation and water chemistry on stress corrosion cracking of austenitic alloys in simulated nuclear power plant coolants were quantitatively investigated. Experimental results showed that increasing material yield strength tends to increase stress corrosion cracking growth rates. Increasing electrode potential tends to increase stress corrosion cracking growth rates of austenitic stainless steels. There is a maximum stress corrosion cracking growth rate for Nickel-base alloys and weld metals at electrode potentials near the Ni-NiO equilibrium line. Crack growth rate of prior-deformed austenitic alloys become less dependent on electrode potential than that of their non-deformed counterparts. The modes of prior-deformation and electrode potential affect the stress corrosion cracking path and growth kinetics. The interactive effects between prior deformation and water chemistry on stress corrosion cracking are analyzed.

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