The ported shroud (PS) self-recirculating casing treatment is widely used to delay the onset of the surge by enhancing the aerodynamic stability of the turbocharger compressor. The increase in the stable operation region of the turbocharger compressor is achieved by recirculating the low momentum fluid that blocks the blade passage to the compressor inlet through a ported shroud cavity. While the ported shroud design delays surge, it comes with a small penalty in efficiency.

This work presents an investigation of the flow processes associated with a ported shroud compressor and quantifies the effect of these flow mechanisms on the compressor operation. The full compressor stage is numerically modelled using a Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) approach employing the shear stress transport (SST) turbulence model for steady state simulations at the design and near surge conditions. The wheel rotation is modelled using a multiple reference frame (MRF) approach. The results show that the flow exits the PS cavity at the near surge condition in the form of three jet-like structures of varying velocity amplitudes. Net entropy generation in the compressor model is used to assess the influence of the ported shroud design on the compressor losses, and the results indicate a small Inlet-PS mixing region is the primary source of entropy generation in the near surge conditions. The analysis also explores the trends of entropy generation at the design and the near surge condition across the different speed lines. The results show that the primary source of entropy generation is the impeller region for the design condition and the inlet-PS cavity region for the near surge condition.

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